COVIDCalls
EP #491 - 3.17.2022 - Restoring Memory: Time and the Virus
EP #490 - 3.17.2022 - Restoring Memory: The COVID Archives
EP #489 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: Fighting for Health w/Gabriel Bosslet
EP #488 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: A Time for Memorial

EP #488 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: A Time for Memorial

March 29, 2022

My name is Scott Gabriel Knowles, I am a historian of disasters and since March 16, 2020 the host of COVIDCalls, a daily discussion of the pandemic with a diverse collection of disaster experts. Today I will be reading some memorials from victims of COVID.

EP #487 - Restoring Memory: The COVIDCalls Team

EP #487 - Restoring Memory: The COVIDCalls Team

March 29, 2022

Today I talk with the core COVIDCalls team!

Eleanor Mayes is completing a Master of Design at the University of California, Berkeley. She is interested in accessibility, sustainability, and fostering equity within design and engineering. She manages the transcription of COVIDCalls, and assists with the roll-out of the COVIDCalls archive and website.

Shivani Patel is a 3rd year undergraduate student at Drexel University studying Finance and Economics with a minor in Philadelphia. For the past two years, she has been working at COVID-Calls as a production assistant helping with scheduling guests and keeping the calendar organized.

Bucky Stanton is a PhD Candidate in the department of Science & Technology Studies (STS) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His dissertation Arkadian Pasts and Futures investigates natural and cultural resource extraction in the central Peloponnese, exploring the history and politics of archaeology, energy and modernity in Greece

EP #486 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: Vaccination in the COVID Era

EP #486 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: Vaccination in the COVID Era

March 28, 2022

My name is Jacob Steere-Williams, I am a Historian of Epidemic Disease and Public Health at the College of Charleston. I’ll be guest hosting a series of episodes for this special program, but you can catch most of them with the regular host and founder of COVID-Calls, Scott Knowles.

My guests today:

Nadja Durbach is Professor of History at the University of Utah. She received her PhD from the Johns Hopkins University and is the author of three books on the history of the body in Modern Britain: Bodily Matters: The Anti-Vaccination Movement in England, 1853-1907 (2005), Spectacle of Deformity: Freak Shows and Modern British Culture (2010) and Many Mouths: The Politics of Food in Britain from the Workhouse to the Welfare State (2020).

Claas Kirchhelle is Assistant Professor of History (Wellcome Trust University Award) at University College Dublin. His research focuses on the history of microbes, infectious disease control, and the development and regulation of antibiotics and vaccines. He has authored three books on the history of antibiotics in food production (Pyrrhic Progress, 2020 (Rutgers)), animal welfare science and activism (Bearing Witness, 2021 (Palgrave)), and typhoid control (Typhoid, 2022 (Scala)). He is also co-curator of two multi award-winning exhibitions on the history of penicillin (Back from the Dead) and typhoid (Typhoidland).

Daniel Goldberg, is an Associate Professor at the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus. Trained as an attorney, a historian of medicine, and an ethicist, his work is wide-ranging on issues of public health law and ethics, population-level bioethics, the social determinants of health, chronic disease, and pain. Dr. Goldberg has published in virtually every important venue, including the American Journal of Bioethics and the New England Journal of Medicine, and he’s been extraordinarily active the past two years in op-eds and interviews about the ongoing pandemic.

EP #485 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: Pandemic and War Part 2

EP #485 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: Pandemic and War Part 2

March 28, 2022

My name is Jacob Steere-Williams, I am a Historian of Epidemic Disease and Public Health at the College of Charleston. I’ll be guest hosting a series of episodes for this special program, but you can catch most of them with the regular host and founder of COVID-Calls, Scott Knowles.

This is Part 2 of a two-part episode exploring the entanglement of the COVID-19 pandemic and the War in Ukraine. Last hour I spoke with Ukrainian health expert Pavlo Kovtoniuk and historian Dora Vargha. On February 24th, 2022, Ukraine’s Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba tweeted that Putin had “launched a full-scale invasion of Ukraine.” Russian attacks began that Thursday after Russian President Vladimir Putin approved in a televised address “a special military operation” in Ukraine. Russian missiles began to attack cities and civilians all across Ukraine. Three weeks later the war in Ukraine rages on. 2 to 3 million Ukrainians have fled the country, and millions more displaced internally within the country, creating a tremendous humanitarian crisis, and what is undoubtedly the largest European military conflict since WWII. Casualty statistics have been difficult to come by- the UN reported yesterday more than 500 civilian Ukrainian deaths, and US military estimates are between 2,000 and 4,000 deaths in the Ukrainian armed forces, and 5,000 to 6,000 deaths of Russian soldiers.

Dr. Trish Starks is a historian of Russian and former Soviet medicine and public health, and a professor of history at the University of Arkansas. She has written extensively on Soviet hygienic reforms in the 1920s in her 2008 book The Body Soviet: Hygiene Propaganda, and the Revolutionary State,  smoking in the Soviet Union in the 2018 book Smoking Under the Tsars, and her newly published book Cigarettes and Soviets: Tobacco in the USSR. She is currently working on gendered anxieties of the body and vigor in Russian contexts.

My second guest, Dr. Paula Michaels, is an Associate Professor of History at Monash University. She is an expert on the history of medicine and gender Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia. Dr. Michaels is a leading expert in the field of trauma studies, publishing numerous articles about childbirth, and maternity care and trauma in Eastern European history. Her 2014 book, Lamaze: An International History, was the winner of the 2015 Frances Richardson Keller-Sierra Prize from the Western Association of Women Historians. In 2021 she published Gender and Trauma Since 1900 with Christina Twomey, and is currently working on a  book project, Soviet Medical Internationalism and the Global Cold War

EP #484 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: Pandemic and War Part 1

EP #484 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: Pandemic and War Part 1

March 28, 2022

This is Part 1 of a two-part episode exploring the entanglement of the COVID-19 pandemic and the War in Ukraine. On February 24th, 2022, Ukraine’s Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba tweeted that Putin had “launched a full-scale invasion of Ukraine.” Russian attacks began that Thursday after Russian President Vladimir Putin approved in a televised address “a special military operation” in Ukraine. Russian missiles began to attack cities and civilians all across Ukraine. Three weeks later the war in Ukraine rages on. 2 to 3 million Ukrainians have fled the country, and millions more displaced internally within the country, creating a tremendous humanitarian crisis, and what is undoubtedly the largest European military conflict since WWII. Casualty statistics have been difficult to come by- the UN reported yesterday more than 500 civilian Ukrainian deaths, and US military estimates are between 2,000 and 4,000 deaths in the Ukrainian armed forces, and 5,000 to 6,000 deaths of Russian soldiers.

My guests today are experts here to help us make sense of the War and the Pandemic

Pavlo Kovtoniuk (Kov-to-Nyuk) is a co-founder of the Ukrainian Healthcare Center - UHC, a think tank located in Kyiv, Ukraine. His background is in health financing and management. In 2016-2019 he served as a vice-minister of health of Ukraine and led a large-scale health system reform in the country. In 2019-2020 he was a consultant at the WHO office for health systems strengthening in Barcelona. During the COVID-19 Pavlo’s team at the UHC monitored the pandemic in Ukraine and supported the government in pandemic response. 

Dora Vargha is Professor of History and Medical Humanities based jointly at Humboldt University in Berlin and the University of Exeter. She is currently leading two research projects on the history of socialism and global health. Previously, she had been co-editor of the journal Social History of Medicine and has worked as an expert for WHO Western Pacific on informing epidemic preparedness with historical perspectives. 

EP #483 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: Poetry in Hard Times
EP #482 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: The Rush to Normal w/Gregg Gonsalves

EP #482 - 3.16.2022 - Restoring Memory: The Rush to Normal w/Gregg Gonsalves

March 23, 2022

My name is Scott Gabriel Knowles, I am a historian of disasters and since March 16, 2020 the host of COVIDCalls, a daily discussion of the pandemic with a diverse collection of disaster experts.

Gregg Gonsalves is an expert in policy modeling on infectious disease and substance use, as well as the intersection of public policy and health equity. For more than 30 years, he worked on HIV/AIDS and other global health issues with several organizations, including the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, the Treatment Action Group, Gay Men’s Health Crisis, and the AIDS and Rights Alliance for Southern Africa. He is a 2018 MacArthur Fellow.

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