COVIDCalls
EP #146 - 10.12.2020 - Small Business and COVID-19

EP #146 - 10.12.2020 - Small Business and COVID-19

October 13, 2020

Today we will discuss the challenges of small businesses during the pandemic with Gregg Bishop, Jabari Jones, Zachary Cox.

Gregg Bishop is currently the Interim Executive Director of Coro New York. He is tasked with leading a civic leadership organization that believes meaningful change comes from collaboration: people in business and communities, schools and unions, government and nonprofits, working together to find creative solutions and strengthen our democracy.

Prior to this role, Bishop served as the Commissioner of the NYC Department of Small Business Services (SBS) where he was charged with running a dynamic City agency focused on equity of opportunity, that leads to economic self-sufficiency and mobility for New York City's diverse communities.

Zachary Cox is a Ph.D. student in the Disaster Science and Management program at the University of Delaware where he also works as a Research Assistant. He holds a Master of Arts in Disaster and Emergency Management from Royal Roads University in Victoria, Canada. 

An experienced disaster practitioner, Zac has worked as a Recovery Management Consultant with IBM and volunteered with the Red Cross’ Personal Disaster Assistance Response Team. He is currently conducting dissertation fieldwork to understand how small businesses are engaging in technical continuity, internal reflection, and external adaptation to navigate COVID-19. 

Jabari K. Jones was recognized to lead the West Philadelphia Corridor Collaborative in 2015.  Upon assuming leadership, Jones laid out a broad vision for connecting the fragmented, hyperlocal business corridors in West Philly into one business community, one ecosystem of support for entrepreneurs.

Under Jones, the Collaborative has become the largest business association in West Philadelphia providing hundreds of hours of free business training, developing private-public partnerships with major companies like Amtrak, Automatic, and Exelon, and building international trade and business relationships with representatives and companies in the African Union, Scotland, and People’s Republic of China.

EP #145 - 10.9.2020 - Week of Mourning Memorial Episode

EP #145 - 10.9.2020 - Week of Mourning Memorial Episode

October 9, 2020

Today we will discuss lives cut short by the COVID-19 pandemic, as part of the Week of Mourning.  This was inspired by my COVIDCalls discussion with Kristin Urquiza and her Marked by COVID, with Christine Keeves.

EP #144 - 10.8.2020 - COVID-19 in the Pyrocene with Stephen Pyne

EP #144 - 10.8.2020 - COVID-19 in the Pyrocene with Stephen Pyne

October 8, 2020

Today we will discuss fire and the pandemic with historian Stephen Pyne.

Steve Pyne is an emeritus professor at Arizona State University. He has been at ASU since 1985.  In 1986 he joined the charter faculty at ASU West, where he remained for 10 years. He transferred to the School of Life Sciences in 1999.

He has published 35 books, most of them dealing with fire, but others on Antarctica, the Grand Canyon, the Voyager mission, and with his oldest daughter, an inquiry into the Pleistocene. His fire histories include surveys of America, Australia, Canada, Europe (including Russia), and the Earth.

The Ice: A Journey to Antarctica was named by the New York Times to its 10 best books for 1987. Fire in America: A Cultural History of Wildland and Rural Fire won the Forest History Society's best book award. He has twice been awarded NEH Fellowships, twice been a fellow at the National Humanities Center, enjoyed a summer Fulbright Fellowship to Sweden, and has received a MacArthur Fellowship (1988-1993).  In 1995 he received the Robert Kirsch Award from the Los Angeles Times for body-of-work contribution to American letters.

EP #143 - 10.8.2020 - Writing Cultural History in a Pandemic

EP #143 - 10.8.2020 - Writing Cultural History in a Pandemic

October 8, 2020

Today we will discuss writing cultural history in the pandemic with Rebecca Onion, staff writer at Slate.

Rebecca Onion writes about culture, history, and childhood for magazines, newspapers, and the Internet. She is currently a staff writer for Slate.com.

She has also written for Aeon Magazine, the Boston Globe’s Ideas section, the Virginia Quarterly Review, The Atlantic‘s website, Topic Magazine, the Austin-American Statesman, PBS’ American Experience website, and others.

She holds a Ph.D and an MA in American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin, and a BA in American Studies from Yale University. 

Her book, Innocent Experiments: Childhood and the Culture of Public Science in the United States, was published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2016. 

EP #142 - Comedy in the COVID-19 Era

EP #142 - Comedy in the COVID-19 Era

October 7, 2020

Today we will discuss Comedy in the age of COVID-19 with Kurt Braunohler.

Kurt Braunohler is a comedian, actor, and writer who once crowdfunded a skywriter to write "How Do I Land" in the sky above LA.He's been seen in movies The Big Sick and Long Shot, as well as Fox's Bob's Burgers, Showtime's Black Monday, and Netflix's Lady Dynamite. He hosts a strange news podcast, BANANAS, as well as the long-running (15 years!) variety show Hot Tub with Kurt and Kristen.

EP #141 - 10.5.2020 - The Pandemic in the Anthropocene

EP #141 - 10.5.2020 - The Pandemic in the Anthropocene

October 6, 2020

Today we will discuss COVID-19 in the Anthropocene with Christoph Rosol and Bernd Scherer.

Christoph Rosol is group leader of the umbrella project “Knowledge in and of the Anthropocene” and a researcher and curator at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin (HKW). He studied the history of science and media studies in Berlin and Toronto. In 2012, he became a Predoctoral Fellow at the MPIWG and, later that year, a Research Associate in HKW’s The Anthropocene Project. As a member of the curatorial team ever since, he has been principally involved in devising and developing the follow-up projects Technosphere and the long-term initiative Anthropocene Curriculum, a global platform for experimental research and education that I co-head together with Katrin Klingan.

In his doctoral research, he deals with the (pre)history and epistemic foundations of General Circulation Models (GCMs), which are derived from numerical weather prediction techniques but have now evolved into a core component of so-called Earth system models.

Dr. Bernd Scherer has been Director of the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (HKW), Berlin, since 2006 and has held an honorary professorship at the Institute for European Ethnology at the Humboldt University of Berlin since 2011. His central areas of work lie in philosophy, semiotics, aesthetics and intercultural questions.

Since 2012, Scherer has headed “The Anthropocene Project” and, since 2014, the project “100 Years of Now,” both at HKW. He is curating the Dictionary of Now as part of the latter project. Parallel to this, he is overseeing the conceptual development of HKW’s third large-scale project, “The New Alphabet.” In his tenure at HKW, Scherer has guided its conceptual development from an institution that presented non-European cultures into one dedicated to the “curating of ideas in the making,” in a world that is changing not only globally, but also in planetary terms.

EP #140 - 10.2.2020 - What would a just COVID-19 Recovery look like?

EP #140 - 10.2.2020 - What would a just COVID-19 Recovery look like?

October 2, 2020

Today we will discuss what it would mean to have a “just recovery” from COVID-19, with a close up look at Philadelphia. 

Saleem Chapman serves as Philadelphia's first Chief Resilience Officer and the Deputy Director for the Philadelphia Office of Sustainability. In these roles, Saleem oversees the creation and implementation of climate preparedness and resilience strategies. He is also responsible for implementing and reporting on Greenworks: A Vision for a Sustainable Philadelphia and applying an equity lens to sustainability. Before joining the City of Philadelphia, Saleem amassed a vast array of experience in the sustainability field, including professional work in urban policy analysis, environmental justice, and sustainable economic development.

David Koppisch is the Director of Strategy for the Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice. David was a co-founder of POWER: An Interfaith Movement where, for eleven years, he helped the organization achieve significant policy wins including a fair formula for the equitable distribution of public school funding in Pennsylvania, fair wages and treatment for workers on city subcontracts, and criminal justice reforms to reduce Philadelphia’s jail population. David’s work with the Women’s Community Revitalization Project and a coalition of housing activists, practitioners, and academics helped create the Philadelphia Housing Trust Fund which has generated more than $150M in new revenue to expand access to affordable housing since 2005. David’s earlier career included work with several other grassroots and community development organizations in Philadelphia. David holds a Master of Social Work degree from Temple University and is a lecturer in the School of Social Policy and Practice at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

EP #139 - 10.1.2020 - Latinos and the COVID-19 Pandemic in the USA

EP #139 - 10.1.2020 - Latinos and the COVID-19 Pandemic in the USA

October 2, 2020

Today I speak about Latinos in the United States in the midst of the pandemic with Washington Post reporter Arelis Hernandez.

Arelis R. Hernandez is the Texas correspondent for the Washington Post covering the southern border region. She has spent the last half year, writing about the ways the coronavirus has impacted the intimate lives of Americans in ways both obvious and unseen. Prior to coming to Texas, she spent years covering natural disasters, protests, mass shootings and political upheaval domestically and briefly, in Venezuela. Hernandez has spent her career covering communities of color and the impact of social and government policy on vulnerable populations.

 

 

EP #138 -9.30.2020 - Food Insecurity in Bangladesh during COVID-19

EP #138 -9.30.2020 - Food Insecurity in Bangladesh during COVID-19

September 30, 2020

Today I speak about COVID-19 IN BANGLADESH AND FOOD INSECURITY with Hanna Ruscczyk, Durham University and Maheen Khan.

Maheen Khan is a writer and co-editor for the Voices from the Frontline initiative by INTL CENTER FOR CLOMATE CHABGE AND DEVELOPMENT ICCCAD and CDKN. She is a communications specialist and has ten years of professional experience across multiple sectors: education, data/tech, and sustainable textiles. Maheen was the founder and creative director of Monokrome, a sustainable fashion startup in Bangladesh. At Monokrome she successfully implemented the circular design economy as its business model. Maheen is currently reading her MSc in Sustainability Science, Policy and Society at Maastricht University, in the Netherlands. She was born in Bangladesh, and had previously attained a Bachelor of Commerce in Marketing and Demography from Macquarie University in Australia.

Hanna A Ruszczyk is a feminist urban geographer at Durham University’s Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience and the Department of Geography. She is interested in how the world’s invisible majority live in academically overlooked smaller cities. Her forthcoming edited book, Overlooked Cities: Power, Politics and Knowledge Beyond the Urban South, Routledge Studies in Urbanism and the City series, will be out in late 2020.

EP #137 - 9.29.2020 - The Pandemic and the Patient’s Experience of Illness

EP #137 - 9.29.2020 - The Pandemic and the Patient’s Experience of Illness

September 30, 2020

Today I speak with medical anthropologist Danya Glabeau and ID social scientist Emily Rogers.

Danya Glabau is an STS scholar and medical anthropologist, and Industry Assistant Professor and Director of the Science and Technology Studies program in the department of Technology, Culture, and Society at NYU Tandon School of Engineering. She has also been Faculty at the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research since 2015. She earned her PhD from the Department of Science and Technology Studies (STS) at Cornell University. Her research examines health activism, the political economy of biomedicine, and how human bodies become valuable data.

Her first book-in-progress, titled Reproducing Safety: Food Allergy Advocacy and the Politics of Care (University of Minnesota Press), examines the reproductive politics of food allergy advocacy in the United States. Her second book project, Cyborg (MIT Press), is co-authored with Laura Forlano (IIT Institute of Design) and will offer an introduction to feminist cyborg theory for scholarly, technical, and non-scholarly audiences.

Emily Lim Rogers is a PhD candidate in the Department of Social & Cultural Analysis at NYU. Her dissertation is an ethnographic and historical investigation of the politics of myalgic encephalomyelitis*/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) in the United States, particularly as it pertains to stratified healthcare infrastructures and gendered/racialized histories of the laboring body.

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