COVIDCalls
EP #384 - 12.06.2021 - Surviving COVID and Experiencing Long COVID w/Majorie Roberts (And Yet Again I Smile)

EP #384 - 12.06.2021 - Surviving COVID and Experiencing Long COVID w/Majorie Roberts (And Yet Again I Smile)

December 6, 2021

Today I welcome Dr. Marjorie Roberts, COVID-19 survivor, Long Covid activist, and life coach.

Dr. Marjorie Roberts is a Certified Life Coach and Speaker who coaches her clients how to create the life of their dreams even after this life-altering virus, COVID-19. Living through this life-altering illness and learning to navigate life differently, she has  a real-time experience with what her clients deal with daily.

Dr. Marjorie's dynamic and authentic coaching style creates trust, motivates, and moves people toward positive change with actionable results. She assists her clients in finding their deep inner happiness after pain, helping them define and achieve goals as they consistently live a more joyful life.

She attended Capella University and obtained a Doctorate Of Business Administration with a Specialization in Strategy and Innovation in 2014. Additionally, Dr. Marjorie gained her Life Coaching Certification in November of 2019.

EP #383 - 11.24.2021 - Black Insercurity at the End of the World w/Justin Mann

EP #383 - 11.24.2021 - Black Insercurity at the End of the World w/Justin Mann

November 29, 2021

Today I welcome Justin Mann author of “Black Insecurity at the End of the World.”

Justin L. Mann is an assistant professor of English and African American Studies at Northwestern University. He has research and teaching interests in African American literature, Black feminist theory, Black speculative fiction, and security policy. His current book project, Breaking the World: Black Insecurity after the New World Order argues that Black speculative fictions are a critical but overlooked archive for understanding America’s security ambitions since the Reagan Administration. Bringing works by Octavia E. Butler, Walter Mosley, Colson Whitehead, and N.K. Jemisin (among others) into conversation with “white papers” Breaking The World argues that Black speculation rejects the false promises of securitization by figuring insecurity as a central mode for making political and social worlds. In his recent article “Black Insecurity at the End of the World,” published in Oct by MELUS, Dr. Mann examines the racialization of disease in Colson Whitehead’s zombie novel, Zone One, arguing that the novel offers different and distinct frames for understanding how disease maps onto logic of racial difference. Dr. Mann’s work has also appeared in the journals Feminist TheorySurveillance & SocietyFeminist Studies, and elsewhere.

EP #382 - 11.23.2021 - New Doctors in the Pandemic

EP #382 - 11.23.2021 - New Doctors in the Pandemic

November 29, 2021

Today I welcome MD/MBA Thomas Irwin to discuss medical education in the time of COVID.

A graduate of the MD/MBA program at the University of Kansas School of Medicine in Kansas City, Tom Irwin worked as an opera singer and bass player for nearly two decades before medical school. Since making a living as a musician requires other work as well, his other employment has included professional sound and musical instrument sales, officiating in minor-league hockey, and producing television news in Louisiana and Tennessee. A native of New Orleans, he has degrees in music from the University of New Orleans and the University of Northern Colorado, and he and his meteorologist wife have two children. He is currently doing a research year with the University of Kansas Cancer Center's Melanoma Project.

 

 

EP #381 - 11.23.2021 - COVID in Japan w/Kyle Cleveland

EP #381 - 11.23.2021 - COVID in Japan w/Kyle Cleveland

November 29, 2021

Today I welcome sociologist Kyle Cleveland from Temple University Japan, co-editor of Legacies of Fukushima: 3.11 in Context.

Kyle Cleveland is Associate Professor of Sociology at Temple University’s Japan Campus (TUJ), where he is Faculty Director of Study Abroad and Honors Programming.   He is the founding director of the university's Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies (ICAS), which organizes cross-disciplinary programming for public lectures and academic symposia, including a series of lectures and symposia related the 3/11 Tohoku disasters.  Since 2011, he has done extensive ethnographic fieldwork in Fukushima, interviewing nuclear refugees, prefectural mayors, military officials, anti-nuclear activists and nuclear industry experts. He is writing a book on the political dimensions of radiation assessment in the Fukushima nuclear crisis, examining how foreign governments in Japan responded to the crisis. He is co-editor (with Scott Knowles and Ryuma Shineha of the book “Legacies of Fukushima: 3/11 in Context,” published by University of Pennsylvania Press (forthcoming in May of 2021). 

EP #380 - 11.22.2021 - Legal Responses to COVID-19

EP #380 - 11.22.2021 - Legal Responses to COVID-19

November 29, 2021

Today I welcome Wendy E. ParMET Parmet, the George J. and Kathleen Waters Matthews Distinguished Professor of Law and Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University—co-editor of Assessing Legal Responses to COVID-19.

Wendy E. Parmet is the George J. and Kathleen Waters Matthews Distinguished Professor of Law and Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University, where she is the faculty director of the Center on Health Policy and Law. Professor Parmet is the author of numerous law review and peer reviewed articles. Her books include The Health of Newcomers: Immigration, Health Policy and the Case for Global Solidarity, co-authored with Patricia Illingworth (2017, NYU Press), Populations, Public Health, and the Law (2009, Georgetown University Press) and the forthcoming Constitutional Contagion, How Constitutional Law is Killing Us. (2023, Cambridge Univ. Press). Professor Parmet is also Associate Editor for Law and Ethics for the American Journal of Public Health.

EP #379 - 11.22.2021 - Pandemic Burnout w/Jenny Pickerill

EP #379 - 11.22.2021 - Pandemic Burnout w/Jenny Pickerill

November 29, 2021

Today I welcome Jenny Pickerill, Professor of Environmental Geography and Head of the Department of Geography at Sheffield University.

Jenny Pickerill is a Professor of Environmental Geography and Head of Department of Geography at Sheffield University, England. Her research focuses on inspiring grassroots solutions to environmental problems and in hopeful and positive ways in which we can change social practices. She has published 3 books (Cyberprotest; Anti-war Activism; Eco-Homes) and over 30 articles on themes around eco-housing, eco-communities, social justice and environmentalism. She is currently completing a book on Eco-communities: Living Together Differently.

EP #378 - 11.18.2021 - Disability Research in the COVID Era + Montana Update

EP #378 - 11.18.2021 - Disability Research in the COVID Era + Montana Update

November 29, 2021

Today I welcome Meg Traci, Mackenzie Jones and Hana Meshesha to discuss their research on people with disabilities copied during the COVID era. Philippa Clarke, is hoping to join us tonight too.

Mackenzie Jones is the Health Education Specialist for the Montana Disability and Health Program at the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services and the Accessibility liaison for the APHA Disability Section.

Hana Meshesha is a doctoral candidate at the Department of Counseling, University of Montana and the Mentoring co-chair for the APHA Disability Section Mentorship program.

Meg Ann Traci is a senior scientist and research associate professor at the University of Montana Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities with nearly thirty years of experience in the field of disability and health.

Dr. Clarke is a Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan's School of Public Health. She is also a Research Professor at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research. Her work examines the social determinants of disability, with a particular focus on the built environment for older adults aging in place.

EP #377 - 11.16.2021 - Pandemic Science and Indigenious Peoples w/Kim Tallbear

EP #377 - 11.16.2021 - Pandemic Science and Indigenious Peoples w/Kim Tallbear

November 17, 2021

Today I welcome Kim Tallbear, author of Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science.

Kim TallBear is a Professor in the Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta, and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience, and Society. She is a citizen of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate in South Dakota. Dr. TallBear is the author of the book Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science. Building on her research on the role of science in settler colonialism, TallBear also studies the roles of the overlapping ideas of “sexuality” and “nature” in colonization of Indigenous peoples. She is a regular commentator in US, Canadian, and UK media outlets on issues related to Indigenous peoples, science, technology, and Indigenous sexualities. She is a regular panelist on the weekly podcast, Media Indigena. She tweets on these topics and more at @KimTallBear. Her research websites include www.IndigenousSTS.com and www.re-lab.ca. You can also follow her occasional posts on her Substack newsletter, Unsettle: Indigenous affairs, cultural politics & (de)colonization, https://kimtallbear.substack.com

EP #376 - 11.15.2021 - Chronic Illness and COVID w/Brianne Benness

EP #376 - 11.15.2021 - Chronic Illness and COVID w/Brianne Benness

November 17, 2021

Today I welcome Brianne Benness host of the No End in Sight podcast.

Brianne Benness is the host of No End In Sight, a podcast about life with chronic illness, and the creator of #NEISVoid, an active community hashtag for questions and conversations about life with chronic illness across diagnosis and diagnostic status. Brianne is also a co-founder of Stories We Don’t Tell, a candid Toronto storytelling event, podcast and anthology. Brianne holds a post-graduate certificate in Media and Medicine from Harvard Medical School and a Master of Architecture from the University of Michigan. Some of her recent work includes her TEDx talk “Disease Begins Before Diagnosis” and a Spring 2021 short course at Grinnell College “Personal Storytelling for Social Impact.”

EP #375 - 11.10.2021 - 700,000 COVID Memorial Flags w/Suzanne Firstenberg

EP #375 - 11.10.2021 - 700,000 COVID Memorial Flags w/Suzanne Firstenberg

November 11, 2021

Today I welcome artist Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg, creator of the In America: Remember COVID memorial in Washington DC.

Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg is a visual artist who has demonstrated the power of art to touch hundreds of thousands of lives. In the Fall of 2020, images of her In America: How could this happen…art installation graced over six hundred news articles on six continents, making visible the pandemic’s cost in American lives.  Her art created a national space for mourning.

Firstenberg believes art has incredible power to educate, inspire, and change the lens through which viewers understand social issues. Interviews, research, and reading ground her work on topics that include gun violence, Native Americans, homelessness, and political partisanship.  The underlying theme is upholding individual dignity, a value honed through her twenty-five years of hospice volunteering.

She travelled to twenty-four states and interviewed hundreds of people in preparation for her newly completed EMPTY FIX project, a seven-installation art series to decrease societal stigma surrounding drug addiction. She had represented the United States at the Harbin (China) International Ice/Snow Sculpting Competition (2016) and has work accessioned by the Smithsonian.

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