COVIDCalls
EP #403 - 01.25.2022 - Public Health, Human Rights, and COVID

EP #403 - 01.25.2022 - Public Health, Human Rights, and COVID

January 25, 2022

Today I speak with social epidemiologist Justin Feldman.

Justin Feldman is a social epidemiologist and a Health and Human Rights Fellow at the Harvard FXB Center for Health & Human Rights. His research looks how racism and economic inequality influence population health. This work has addressed multiple domains including police violence, residential segregation, and the toll of the COVID-19 pandemic.

EP #243 - 03/22/2021 - Decolonizing COVID: Pandemics and Global History w/Helen Tilley

EP #243 - 03/22/2021 - Decolonizing COVID: Pandemics and Global History w/Helen Tilley

January 23, 2022

Today is a discussion of decolonizing global health and the history of medicine with historian Helen Tilley.

Helen Tilley is a professor of History at Northwestern University.  Her book, Africa as a Living Laboratory: Empire, Development, and the Problem of Scientific Knowledge (Chicago, 2011) explores the dynamic interplay between scientific research and imperialism in British Africa between 1870 and 1950. It received the Ludwik Fleck Prize from the Society for the Social Studies of Science (2014). She has also written articles and book chapters on the history of ecology, eugenics, agriculture, and epidemiology in tropical Africa, and is co-editor with Robert Gordon of Ordering Africa: Anthropology, European Imperialism and the Politics of Knowledge (Manchester, 2007) and with Michael Gordin and Gyan Prakash of Utopia-Dystopia: Historical Conditions of Possibility (Princeton, 2010).

Her current project focuses on the history of African decolonization, global governance, and the ethnoscientific projects that accompanied state building in the colonial and Cold War era. At Northwestern, she directs Science in Human Culture and holds a Faculty Fellowship with the Buffett Institute for Global Studies. She is also affiliated with the programs in African Studies, Global Health, Legal Studies, and Environmental Policy and Culture.

EP #402 - 1.19.2022 - The Relentless School Nurse w/ Robin Cogan

EP #402 - 1.19.2022 - The Relentless School Nurse w/ Robin Cogan

January 20, 2022

Today I speak with school nursing practitioner and leader Robin Cogan—author of The Relentless School Nurse blog.

 

EP #401 - 1.18.2022 - Interfaith Dialogue and Religious Institutions in the Pandemic w/Rabbi Mike Harvey

EP #401 - 1.18.2022 - Interfaith Dialogue and Religious Institutions in the Pandemic w/Rabbi Mike Harvey

January 20, 2022

Today I speak with Rabbi Mike Harvey, Resident Chaplain within the Indiana University Health system in Indianapolis.

Rabbi Mike Harvey is a Resident Chaplain within the IU Health system in Indianapolis, Indiana.  He was ordained from Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion in 2015 and is a strong proponent of interfaith dialogue and communication.  His book “Let’s Talk: A Rabbi Speaks to Christians” will be published by Fortress Press in Summer 2022.  Rabbi Harvey also hosts a podcast with an Episcopal Priest entitled “A Priest and a Rabbi Walk into a Bar.”  For more information on Rabbi Harvey, go to www.RabbiMichaelHarvey.com.

EP #400 - 1.17.2022 - COVID and Engineering Education w/Sharon Walker

EP #400 - 1.17.2022 - COVID and Engineering Education w/Sharon Walker

January 20, 2022

Today I speak with Drexel University dean of engineering, Professor Sharon Walker about engineering education in the time of a pandemic.

Dr. Sharon L. Walker, PhD, is Dean of Drexel’s College of Engineering and Distinguished Professor in the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering. A Yale University-trained water quality systems expert focusing on the fate and transport of bacteria and nanoparticles in water, Walker is also a fellow in the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (AEESP) and in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

She is a winner of the Fulbright Fellowship, for which she visited at Ben Gurion University of the Negev in Israel; received an NSF Career Award in 2010; and held an ELATE fellowship from 2014-15. Walker has produced more than 250 conference papers and publications, and in 2018 won the AEESP inaugural Mary Ann Liebert Award for Publication Excellence in Environmental Engineering Science.

EP #399 - 1.14.2022 - New Research: COVID, Digital Technology, and Plastic Waste in South Korea

EP #399 - 1.14.2022 - New Research: COVID, Digital Technology, and Plastic Waste in South Korea

January 20, 2022

Today is a researchers’ roundtable day on #COVIDCalls, and I welcome KAIST graduate students Hyon Soo Jeong and Hyunah Keum to talk about their new research on COVID.

Hyunah Keum is a master's candidate at the Graduate School of Science and Technology Policy, in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology. She recently finished her master’s thesis titled “Making Waste Acceptable and Invisible: The COVID-19 Pandemic and Material Politics of Plastic Waste in South Korea,” where she argues that plastic waste has not just increased in Korea during COVID-19 pandemic, a time when the government both allowed discard of disposable plastics and invisibilized the infrastructure to treat those wastes. She wants to expand her area of research into revealing unequal relationships around waste, and its impacts on different beings, humans and non-humans. 

Hyon Soo Jeong is a master's candidate at the Graduate School of Science and Technology Policy in KAIST. She is interested in data sharing during COVID-19, and her internship experience at United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Seoul Policy Center inspired her to study public-private partnerships driven by Information and Communication Technology. Her Master's thesis is titled “A study of coproduction for information sharing during COVID-19: focusing on the case of citizen-developed map services in South Korea,” and her study focuses on how Korean civil society's action of information sharing driven by open government data influenced COVID-19 policy in South Korea.

EP #398 - 1.13.2022 - The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) in the Pandemic Era

EP #398 - 1.13.2022 - The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) in the Pandemic Era

January 20, 2022

Today I welcome Hana Kim and June-Yi Lee to discuss their work on climate change adaptation and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in the COVID Era.

Hana Kim is an assistant professor of School of Humanities & Social Sciences at Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Republic of Korea. She received a Ph.D. in Energy and Environmental Policy from University of Delaware, United States. Her research interests are equity issues related to energy and climate change policies, energy transition, and non-state stakeholders’ responses to climate changes. Currently, she is working on several research projects related to sustainability issues in urban areas as well. 

June-Yi Lee is Associate Professor of Research Center for Climate Sciences, Pusan National University; and Associate Project Leader of Institute for Basic Science Center for Climate Physics. She holds a Ph.D. Atmospheric Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. Earth system predictability including not only physical variables but also biogeochemical cycle on intraseasonal-interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. She is a Core Writing Team member, IPCC 6th Assessment Synthesis Report.

 

EP #397 - 1.12.2022 - The COVID-19 Racial Justice Syndemic

EP #397 - 1.12.2022 - The COVID-19 Racial Justice Syndemic

January 12, 2022

Today I welcome educational psychology professor Kevin Cokley co-author of the new article The COVID‐19/racial injustice syndemic andmental health among Black Americans

Kevin Cokley, Ph.D. holds the Oscar and Anne Mauzy Regents Professorship for Educational Research and Development in the College of Education at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a Fellow of the University of Texas System and University of Texas Academy of Distinguished Teachers, Chair of the Department of Educational Psychology, Professor of Educational Psychology and African and African Diaspora Studies, and past Director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis.   He holds the title of Distinguished Psychologist and received the Scholarship Award from the Association of Black Psychologists. He has written several Op-Eds in major media outlets on topics such as Blacks’ rational mistrust of police, the aftermath of Ferguson, police and race relations, racism and White supremacy, the use of school vouchers, and racial disparities in school discipline. His research has been recognized in media outlets including the New York Times, USA Today, and Inside Higher Education.

EP #396 - 1.12.2022 - The COVID-19 Comission

EP #396 - 1.12.2022 - The COVID-19 Comission

January 12, 2022

Today I welcome Philip Zelikow, who served as the executive director of the 9/11 Commission, and also served on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Boards in the administrations of George W. Bush and Barack Obama. We will discuss the work of the COVID Commission Planning Group.

Philip Zelikow is the White Burkett Miller Professor of History at the University of Virginia, where he has also served as dean of the Graduate School and director of the Miller Center. His scholarly work has focused on critical episodes in American and world history. 

He was a trial and appellate lawyer and then a career diplomat before taking academic positions at Harvard, then Virginia.  His government career includes federal service during five administrations positions in the White House, State Department, and the Pentagon. His last full-time government position was as the counselor of the Department of State, a deputy to Secretary Condoleezza Rice. 

He was the executive director of the 9/11 Commission. 

He is one of the few individuals ever to serve on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Boards for presidents of both parties, in the administrations of George W. Bush and Barack Obama. 

EP #395 - 01.10.2022 - Disaster Justice

EP #395 - 01.10.2022 - Disaster Justice

January 11, 2022

Today I welcome Robert Verchick, Environmental Law  professor at Loyola University New Orleans.

"Rob Verchick is one of the nation’s leading scholars in disaster and climate change law and a former EPA official in the Obama administration. He teaches at Loyola University New Orleans and at Tulane University. He also hosts the podcast, “CPR’s Connect the Dots,” which focuses on climate justice, health and safety, and improving democracy."

Rob Verchick holds the Gauthier-St. Martin Chair in Environmental Law at Loyola University New Orleans. He is also a Senior Fellow at Tulane University's Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy, in the School of Social Work, and President of the Center for Progressive Reform, a national policy institute focused on public health, public welfare, and environmental protection.  Professor Verchick served in the Obama administration as Deputy Associate Administrator for Policy at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2009 and 2010

His work has appeared in many venues, including the California Law Review, the Southern California Law Review, and the environmental law journals at Harvard, Stanford, and Berkeley. He is the author of three books, including Facing Catastrophe: Environmental Action for a Post-Katrina World (Harvard University Press 2010) which was selected as a CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title by the American Library Association.

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