COVIDCalls
EP #342 - 09.15.2021 - Crisis: A Term for These Times w/Rosalind Williams

EP #342 - 09.15.2021 - Crisis: A Term for These Times w/Rosalind Williams

September 16, 2021

Today I welcome Rosalind Williams to the program to discuss her latest article Crisis: The Emergence of Another Hazardous Concept.

Rosalind Williams taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1982 to her retirement in 2018. In 2001 she joined MIT’s Program in Science, Technology, and Society, serving as program head from 2002-06. Her main scholarly affiliation is the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT), of which she served as president in 2005-06, and from which she received its highest award, the Leonardo da Vinci Prize, in 2013. 

Her first three books (Dream Worlds, Notes from the Underground, Retooling) address this question: what are the implications for human life, both individual and collective, when we live in a predominantly self-constructed world?  In responding to it, she has studied the emergence of consumer culture in late l9th century France; in the creation of underworlds, both imagined and actual, as models of a technological environment; and the retooling of MIT as the Institute confronts the effects of an information age of which it has been a prime generator.  

Her most recent book, The Triumph of Human Empire (University of Chicago Press, 2013) examines the works and lives of three well-known writers (Jules Verne, William Morris, and Robert Louis Stevenson) to illuminate the event of consciousness at the end of the l9th century, when humans realized that they were close to mapping the entire globe and that the global frontier was closing.

EP #341 - 09.14.2021 - COVID Memorials w/Guest Host Kristin Urquiza
EP #340 - 09.13.2021 - The Anthro-Shift: Climate, Risk, and COVID-19

EP #340 - 09.13.2021 - The Anthro-Shift: Climate, Risk, and COVID-19

September 16, 2021

Today I welcome sociologist of risk and the environment Dana Fisher.

Dana R. Fisher is a Professor in the Sociology Department at the University of Maryland. Her research focuses on questions related to democracy, activism, and climate politics.  Recent projects include a study of responses to climate change by political elites in the US, the emergence of the Civilian Climate Corps, and activism and protest around a range of issues.  Professor Fisher has authored over sixty-five research papers and book chapters and has written six books.  Her most recent book is American Resistance (Columbia University Press 2019). She currently serves as a Contributing Author for Working Group 3 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Sixth Assessment Review (IPCC AR6) writing about citizen engagement and civic activism.. She is also a Nonresident Senior Fellow with the Governance Studies program at The Brookings Institution.

EP #339 - 09.13.2021 - Doctors with Disabilities in the Fight against COVID

EP #339 - 09.13.2021 - Doctors with Disabilities in the Fight against COVID

September 16, 2021

Today I welcome Peter Poullos to discuss doctors with disabilities in COVID times.

Dr. Peter Poullos is Clinical Associate Professor of Radiology and Gastroenterology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In 2003, as a G.I. fellow at UC San Francisco, he suffered a spinal cord injury and subsequently re-trained in radiology.  His specialty is body imaging, focusing on CT, MRI, and ultrasound of gastrointestinal diseases.  He is the Founder and Cochair of the Stanford Medicine Abilities Coalition. He is a member of the School of Medicine Faculty Senate and the Stanford Medicine Diversity Cabinet.  His work focuses on advocacy, education, and health equity for those with disabilities. He is the cohost of the Docs With Disabilities Podcast.

EP #338 - 09.09.2021 - Classroom Teachers in the Pandemic

EP #338 - 09.09.2021 - Classroom Teachers in the Pandemic

September 10, 2021

Today I welcome teachers Rebecca Martinson and Angela Minor back to COVIDCalls to talk about COVID and the return to school. 

Rebecca Martinson is a nurse teaching intro to nursing and Anateomy and Physiology to high school students for 10 years-  it is her 11th year teaching. She wrote an oped for the New York Times last summer critical of the planning going into covid safety related to schools. During the past year in addition to teaching she has volunteered at several mass vaccination clinics as a draw nurse and vaccinator. Her area is seeing its largest surge ever in Covid19 cases and hospitalizations however under her governors order she is returning full time in person to the classroom on September 1. 

Mrs. Angela Minor has been teaching high school students since 1995. She currently teaches AP Government, Current World Issues and issues and Advocacy: Class, Race and Gender in America in lower Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She also teaches graduate classes through The Regional Training Center which partners with LaSalle University and the College of New Jersey. 

EP #337 - 09.09.2021 - Disaster Memory in East Asia

EP #337 - 09.09.2021 - Disaster Memory in East Asia

September 10, 2021

Today I talk with historians Alex Jania and Kristina Buhrman about COVID and disaster memory in East Asia.

Kristina Buhrman is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Religion at Florida State University. Her research focuses on the history of knowledge in and about premodern Japan, covering topics from divination and astrology to disasters. She has been a member of the Teach 3.11 collective since 2011, and is currently an editor for the site.

Alex Jania is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History at University of Chicago focusing on Modern Japan. He is currently writing a dissertation on post-disaster memorialization in 20th and 21st century Japan and its place in global memory culture. Alex’s scholarship is part of a larger commitment to share the stories of Japanese disaster survivors for English speaking audiences. In particular, he has been involved in public history efforts like Humans of Minamisanriku and the Osaka Committee of Chicago Sister Cities International’s Kizuna Project, which both focus on the stories of 3/11 survivors in the Tōhoku region.

EP #336 - 09.08.2021 - Humanitarian Aid in the COVID-19 Era w/Peter Redfield

EP #336 - 09.08.2021 - Humanitarian Aid in the COVID-19 Era w/Peter Redfield

September 9, 2021

Today I talk with anthropologist Peter Redfield, author of Life in Crisis, the Ethical Journey of Doctors Without Borders.

Peter Redfield is Professor of Anthropology and Erburu Chair in Ethics, Globalization and Development at the University of Southern California.  Trained as a cultural anthropologist sympathetic to history, he concentrates on circulations of science, technology and medicine in colonial and postcolonial contexts. The author of Life in Crisis: The Ethical Journey of Doctors Without Borders (University of California Press 2013) and Space in the Tropics: From Convicts to Rockets in French Guiana (University of California Press 2000), he is also coeditor of Forces of Compassion:  Humanitarianism between Ethics and Politics (SAR Press 2011), and an issue of the journal Limn (2018) on the theme of “Little Development Devices and Humanitarian Goods.”  He has held fellowships at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, in addition to serving as President of the Society for Cultural Anthropology.   

EP #335 - 09.07.2021 - Special Guest Host Episode with Kristen Urquiza

EP #335 - 09.07.2021 - Special Guest Host Episode with Kristen Urquiza

September 8, 2021

Welcome to episode 335 of COVIDCalls, a daily discussion of the COVID-19 pandemic with a diverse collection of disaster experts. My name is Kristin Urquiza, and I’m guest hosting for the day. I am the co-founder and co-executive director of Marked By COVID, which is a national, grassroots-powered, non-partisan nonprofit organization that promotes accountability, recognition, justice, and a pandemic-free future by elevating truth and science. It was founded just days after my first-generation Mexican-American father, Mark, passed away from the virus.  I am coming to you live from San Francisco, California.

Today I will talk with Trevor Nelson and Tara Krebbs. Both are  parents and activists in Arizona, the state I grew up in, and where my father passed away last June.

Trevor Nelson is a parent of 4 school aged children, former science teacher, and community organizer with Right2SafeSchoolsAZ.org.

Tara Krebbs is the COVID Justice Leader for the Marked By COVID Arizona chapter. She joined the group after losing her Dad, Charles Henry Krebbs of Phoenix, Ariz died of COVID-19 last summer. She is a parent of a high school senior, Scotty.

EP #334 - 09.06.2021 - Teaching Medieval History in the COVID Era

EP #334 - 09.06.2021 - Teaching Medieval History in the COVID Era

September 7, 2021

Today I talk with Esther Liberman Cuenca about teaching medieval history in the COVID Era.

Esther Liberman Cuenca is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Houston-Victoria, in Victoria, TX. She teaches courses in World, European, American, and Medieval History, and has published widely on pedagogy. She recently edited a special cluster of essays for the journal EuropeNow, which is published by the Council of European Studies at Columbia University, on teaching medieval history in the COVID era.

EP #333 - 09.02.2021 - Disability Rights, Activism, and COVID w/Ashley Shew

EP #333 - 09.02.2021 - Disability Rights, Activism, and COVID w/Ashley Shew

September 3, 2021

Today I talk with disability activist and scholar Ashley Shew, professor of Science, Technology, and Society at Virginia Tech.

Ashley Shew is an associate professor of Science, Technology, and Society at Virginia Tech. Her current work, as part of a National Science Foundation CAREER grant, examines narratives disabled people share about technology, that are often different from dominant ways of thinking about disability tech. She is co-editor of three edited volumes in philosophy of technology, current co-editor-in-chief of Techné (the journal of the Society for Philosophy and Technology), and author of Animal Constructions and Technological Knowledge (2017). She works alongside other disabled people on issues of disability rights, inclusion, and activism through her local center for independent living and through the campus group the Disability Alliance and Caucus. Her writing on disabled positionality, tech, and access has been featured within the past 18 months in Nature, AAUP's Academé, and Inside Higher Ed. She is a proud signatory of the Accessible Campus Action Alliance's Statement on "Beyond High Risk," that advises universities in colleges to enact "a new, accessible normal" as pandemic planning continues. 

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